2018/19 Partner Club2018-08-08T19:04:48+00:00

Welcome to the Coerver Partner Club program for 2018/19 season.

The aim of this is to help your club to put the foundations in place in terms of the grassroots player development.

The program is based around mentoring and helping coaches to understand how to coach younger players effectively.

Coerver Coaching will provide you with a framework to work with and will provide ongoing assistance throughout the season.

See below is the basic session structure that we will use for the coming season.

Each week a session plan is provided, so take the time to review this prior to the session

Be prepared, have everything you need for the whole session at your pitch prior to starting to save time.

How many cones, bibs, balls ? How much space ? How many players ?

Keep things simple, work backwards in terms of space management:

  1. Pitch Size required for game at the end
  2. Space & Layout required for drill (inside the pitch)
  3. Space & Layout for warm up

Parts 2 & 3 should fit inside part 1

During the season we will use a variety of warm up practices.

The warm up should last between 10 – 15 mins, so you need to manage the time effectively, too long and players get bored, too short you have probably missed out key coaching points.

The most important part of the session, so all coaches need to effective to set the tone and help players understand the theme.

The warm up provides:

  1.  An pre session activity to keep players focussed and active whilst waiting for everyone to arrive
  2. The technical content with ball mastery & skills for the session
  3. A soccer related aerobic workout to get the body ready for the session

Therefore the warm up should be delivered at a good tempo, with the appropriate stoppages with relevant key learning points.

Make sure you give players sufficient time to try to learn new skills, before stepping in to correct.

Good effective observational skills are required to note which players need extra help when learning new skills & techniques.

This will be some form of game that is based around the theme, so the focus of the coach must stay with what we are working on.

For example is we are working on turning, there is no point in praising a goal being scored or other aspects that catch the attention.

Stay with the technique worked on and understand how the structure of the drill should deliver the desired outcome.

The game at the end of the session should in some way be linked to the theme, even if it is a normal match, coaches observations and comments should be linked back to the topice we have covered in the session.

Simple rules

Do not play larger games than the FAI development plan for your age group

Stop coaching the players on the ball, let them show you what they know

Observation is key, watch the games and see what players need help and decide what is the best approach

Try not to stop the game too much, most of your coaching should of been done prior to this

Remember to praise the topic your working on, it is still training / development

Really simple at the end of the session get the players together and check they have understood what they have just been working on.

We have all been there…

The week where no matter what you try it just isnt working, what do we do ?

First thing is try to step back and observe what is going wrong and why.

If you think you can adjust the session and get it back on track within the time allocations do so.

If not stop what you are doing and play your get out of jail card, below are a few basic layouts for warm ups, drills & games that should be simple to implement and enjoyable for the players.

The warm up provides:

  1.  An pre session activity to keep players focussed and active whilst waiting for everyone to arrive
  2. The technical content with ball mastery & skills for the session
  3. A soccer related aerobic workout to get the body ready for the session

Therefore the warm up should be delivered at a good tempo, with the appropriate stoppages with relevant key learning points.

Make sure you give players sufficient time to try to learn new skills, before stepping in to correct.

Good effective observational skills are required to note which players need extra help when learning new skills & techniques.

Warm Up Types

Random Warm Up – Ball per player working individually.

Logical Steps for random warm up:

So every player and coach has a ball and they start by moving around freely inside their area

Step 1 – Can we keep the ball under control, after every step we gently stroke the ball ahead

Step 2– Now we have the ball under control we dont need to keep looking at it, so can we get our eyes up

Step 3 – Now we have our eyes up, can we find space – what do good players find ?

Try to get everyone working hard and moving quickly, without being out of control or a potential danger to others

Then look to add in this weeks ball mastery and skill.

Grid Style Warm Up – Can be 1 ball per player or less

A more rigid style warm up, used when trying to focus more on technique.

Can become boring or repetitive for players, so need to have a few progressions included.

A strong coaching presence is also required to keep everyone focussed and working as required

3. Rondo / Keep Ball – 1 ball per group

 A simple game of keep ball / Piggy in the middle, can be developed to suit the age and ability levels of the players involved.

Important to revert back to this on a regular basis as the focus on recieving and passing a ball needs to be a key part of every session

Popular Drill formats

Defender v Attackers

 

This tends to be using the full pitch a combination of 1v1/2v2/3v3, and depending on the theme there could be rules of start points to encourage specific movements.

Eg

1 directional game – feints and skills to be opponent

2 directional game  –  turning

End zones with no goals – dribbling or running with the ball

Similar rules in all games, focus is generally on the attacker, but if the defender wins the ball they can attack. Really important that we reward the defender if the win the ball, in a match we would want them to break and score, so we do the same with the drill.

Passing / Turning Circle

Can be used as part of a warm up or a drill, with players active in the middle and support players on the outside.

Very effective when working on close control, receiving & passing.

The key is to get a good tempo and make sure players on the outside are not inactive for too long.

3 Game Options

  1.  Age Appropriate Match

Based on the FAI Development Plan, same pitch size, number of players, etc.

Get your players used to playing in games, also helps coaches to understand how to play these games with roll on/off subs.

Players need rest time and need to be comfortable being one of the subs, so try to follow the guidelines.

If you dont have enough players or the correct space to do it properly don’t do it.

2. Small Sided Games

Teams of 3 to 5 players playing on a small pitch with small goals.

Basic Rules

No Goalkeepers, 1 touch finish, must score inside scoring zone, no corners, if the ball goes out for a throw the opposition can dribble the ball back in

It should be a really fast game, with players getting lots of touches.

To the adult coach it will look chaos at times, its supposed to thats how kids learn.

Lots of touches – lots of mistakes- lots of learning

3. Small Sided Tournament

As above, in terms of basic set up and rules, but have 1 team resting

Split your group into 3 teams play games for 1 goal then rotate

If games are not getting goals, just add in a 20 second countdown and the swap the teams